JavaScript EditorFreeware javascript editor     Javascript code


Main Page

Previous Page
Next Page

Chapter 4: Membership and User Profiling

The sample web site developed in this book contains dynamic content such as news, events, newsletters, polls, forum posts, and more. It can be considered a content-based site, where significant parts of the site can be easily changed or updated by privileged users (this functionality is sometimes called a content management system), although it differs from many content-based sites because we've also added an important e-commerce section that enables our investors to earn a healthy return on their investment. Here's a secret (although not a well-kept one) for any content-based site that wants to be successful: build a vigorous and thriving community of users! If you have a lot of loyal users, you can be sure that the site will increase its user base, and thus its size, its popularity, and your revenues. You want to encourage users to register for a free account on the site so you can enable them to customize their view, participate in message forums, and even order merchandise from e-commerce pages. Once they obtain a free account they will be a member of the site. Membership is a form of empowerment — they will feel special because they are a member, and you want to reward their loyalty by enabling them to customize certain visual aspects, and to remember their settings on their return visits. In order to track members, it is necessary to have some sort of identity to describe and distinguish them from other members and, more important, against anonymous users who have not logged in. This chapter will explain how to develop user registration functionality and user profiles. The user account will also be used to grant or deny access to special restricted pages of the site. The profile will be used by modules developed later in this book to customize content and give users a public "virtual face," visible to other members and users.

Problem

In reality, a membership system is a requirement for most web sites — not only for community and content-based sites. Sites typically have a number of administration pages that visitors should not have access to. The administration section can be as complete as an application in itself, or just a couple of simple pages to allow people to change some settings. However, you always need to identify each user who tries to access those restricted pages, and check whether they are authorized to do so. The means of identifying a user is called authentication, and the means of determining what access a user has is called authorization. Unfortunately, it's easy to confuse these terms, so it helps to think of the root words: authenticate (who are you?) and authorize (now that I know you, what are you allowed to do?). The authentication and authorization processes are part of the site's membership system, which includes the creation of new user accounts, the management of the user's credentials (including protection mechanisms such as encryption and password recovery in case passwords are lost or forgotten), and roles associated with an account. For the sample site, the membership system must be complete, as it will be used by administrators and editors to access protected areas, and by users who want to have their own identity within the community, post messages to the forums, and be recognized by other members. It must enable users to create their account interactively without administrator intervention, and to update their profile information on demand.

Administrators must also be able to see a list of registered users, and to control them. For example, if there is a user who regularly posts spam or offending messages to the forum, a good administrator (or forum moderator) will want to temporarily or permanently disable this user's account. Conversely, if a user always behaves well and respects the site's policies, an administrator may decide to promote him to the status of moderator, or even editor. In other words, modifying user account settings and their roles should be an easy thing to do, because the administrator may need to do it frequently. Thus, we require an easy-to-use administration section to manage user accounts.

To make it easier to manage security permissions, we'll create roles that are basically a group of users who have special permission in addition to the normal user permissions. For example, the Administrators role will be used to designate certain individuals who will have the capability to manage user accounts and site content.

Although a membership system is necessary for common security-related tasks, other things are needed in order to build an effective community of happy users. The users expect to have some benefits from their registration. For example, they could receive newsletters with useful information (with links back to the web site), and they could customize the home page so that it highlights the type of content they are most interested in. Furthermore, their preferred site template could be saved and restored between sessions. All this information makes up what's called a user profile. Implementing a system for profiling the user is a good thing not just for the end user, but also for the site administrators. Among the information stored in the profile is the user's age, gender, and full address. A savvy administrator could later make use of such data in a variety of ways:

The site administrator will need an intuitive console from which she can see and edit the profile of any user — to remove an offending signature or avatar image (an avatar image is a small picture of a user, or a "cool" signature picture a user wants to display next to their name) used in the forums.


Previous Page
Next Page


JavaScript EditorFreeware javascript editor     Javascript code 
Bitcoin Dice Site