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22.9. MySQL Program Development Utilities

This section describes some utilities that you may find useful when developing MySQL programs.

22.9.1. msql2mysql — Convert mSQL Programs for Use with MySQL

Initially, the MySQL C API was developed to be very similar to that for the mSQL database system. Because of this, mSQL programs often can be converted relatively easily for use with MySQL by changing the names of the C API functions.

The msql2mysql utility performs the conversion of mSQL C API function calls to their MySQL equivalents. msql2mysql converts the input file in place, so make a copy of the original before converting it. For example, use msql2mysql like this:

shell> cp client-prog.c client-prog.c.orig
shell> msql2mysql client-prog.c
client-prog.c converted

Then examine client-prog.c and make any post-conversion revisions that may be necessary.

msql2mysql uses the replace utility to make the function name substitutions. See Section 8.28, “replace — A String-Replacement Utility”.

22.9.2. mysql_config — Get Compile Options for Compiling Clients

mysql_config provides you with useful information for compiling your MySQL client and connecting it to MySQL.

mysql_config supports the following options:

  • --cflags

    Compiler flags to find include files and critical compiler flags and defines used when compiling the libmysqlclient library.

  • --include

    Compiler options to find MySQL include files. (Note that normally you would use --cflags instead of this option.)

  • --libmysqld-libs, --embedded

    Libraries and options required to link with the MySQL embedded server.

  • --libs

    Libraries and options required to link with the MySQL client library.

  • --libs_r

    Libraries and options required to link with the thread-safe MySQL client library.

  • --port

    The default TCP/IP port number, defined when configuring MySQL.

  • --socket

    The default Unix socket file, defined when configuring MySQL.

  • --version

    Version number for the MySQL distribution.

If you invoke mysql_config with no options, it displays a list of all options that it supports, and their values:

shell> mysql_config
Usage: /usr/local/mysql/bin/mysql_config [options]
Options:
  --cflags         [-I/usr/local/mysql/include/mysql -mcpu=pentiumpro]
  --include        [-I/usr/local/mysql/include/mysql]
  --libs           [-L/usr/local/mysql/lib/mysql -lmysqlclient -lz
                    -lcrypt -lnsl -lm -L/usr/lib -lssl -lcrypto]
  --libs_r         [-L/usr/local/mysql/lib/mysql -lmysqlclient_r
                    -lpthread -lz -lcrypt -lnsl -lm -lpthread]
  --socket         [/tmp/mysql.sock]
  --port           [3306]
  --version        [4.0.16]
  --libmysqld-libs [-L/usr/local/mysql/lib/mysql -lmysqld -lpthread -lz
                    -lcrypt -lnsl -lm -lpthread -lrt]

You can use mysql_config within a command line to include the value that it displays for a particular option. For example, to compile a MySQL client program, use mysql_config as follows:

shell> CFG=/usr/local/mysql/bin/mysql_config
shell> sh -c "gcc -o progname `$CFG --cflags` progname.c `$CFG --libs`"

When you use mysql_config this way, be sure to invoke it within backtick (‘`’) characters. That tells the shell to execute it and substitute its output into the surrounding command.

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